Denver, City of Change

I’ve traveled a lot this year and each time I return to Denver, I see change. We are growing and changing at a rapid pace, ranked by Forbes as the […]

November 28, 2015 // Tracy Shaffer // No Comments //

I’ve traveled a lot this year and each time I return to Denver, I see change. We are growing and changing at a rapid pace, ranked by Forbes as the Best Place for Business and Careers, with Colorado at #5 in Best States for Business, it doesn’t look like this is going to change anytime soon. I’ve heard the complaints about sky-high rents, heard the bitching over the city’s events ban, increasing traffic and the loss of our neighborhood character with the rise of the Box Populi. And I get it. I spent the better part of 2015 showing homes and writing very competitive offers for a first-time buyer, only to have a cash buyer swoop in and steal the deal. She wasn’t alone. It’s been tough, we’ve got issues. Much of what is happening to our city is due to the fact that we have a good and healthy economy, and isn’t that a good thing? Not the way you’d hear tell. 2006-07-14-Denver_Skyline_Midnight
An article in the New Republic blames the marijuana industry for rising home prices, South Park creators, Matt Stone and Trey Parker have weighed in on the issue and Westword, a vocal critic of our change of face, blames California. I’ve been to California, I was raised in California, and Colorado, you are no California. (at least not yet)
It’s much easier to sit and point than it is to get up, get educated and get active. We’ve seen what happened in Hilltop, in the Highlands, so with a construction roll-off on every block it’s essential that we take ownership of our city, our communities. Residents of (my beloved) Park Hill want to control the future of the neighborhood and preserve it’s character, forming the Historic Park Hill Committee and initiating the designation of a Landmark Historical District within the core of the neighborhood. Of course, there are those who oppose the movement but the conversation is happening and Park Hill citizens are active in the vision. The Baker, Potter Highlands, Montclair and Curtis Park neighborhoods have gracefully maintained their spirit within the growth spurt so we know it can be done. It’s a matter of who among us and how many of us are interested in doing more than complaining? Change is inevitable, it’s up to each of us to make sure that change is good.


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